The Importance of Being Optimistic

“Instead of worrying about what you cannot control, shift your energy to what you can create.”  ― Roy T. Bennett, The Light in the Heart

It’s a new day, a new year, and a new way to live your life.

This year all zodiac signs will benefit from the Year of the Earth Pig. Chinese astrology suggests 2019 will be a year full of joy, friendship and love. It’s an auspicious year because the Pig attracts success in all the spheres of life.

But there’s a catch. According to Chinese tradition we will need to learn how to take advantage of everything that’s beautiful in life in 2019. So it is time to ramp up optimism and positive thoughts as all qualities of the Pig sign will find a way to express themselves this year.

We’ll be exposed to gentleness and generosity, but we’ll need to be more attentive to others and, on a collective level, to altruistic initiatives.

And yes, optimism doesn’t solve all of life’s problems but sometimes it can make the difference between coping and collapsing.

‘It’s not easy being optimistic but positive self talk is the core of optimism.’ ––  LUCY MACDONALD, Learn to Be an Optimist  

Sounds great so we’ll need to catch our negative inner critic before it starts beating us up. 

When that happens, make a start by telling yourself: It’s your right to enjoy life.  Use Health Storylines to give yourself some Healthy Doses of positive thoughts. Choose from Love, Gratitude, Optimism, Funny and Mindfulness. Each saying will lift your spirits. For example, under Mindfulness Mother Teresa tells us to “be happy in the moment, that’s enough. Each moment is all we need, not more.”

Or use Health Storylines to practise regular gratitude. Use the Journal or Positive Thoughts Diary tools to become more optimistic by writing down the things you are grateful for.

www.confidentlife.com.au says not only does expressing gratitude light up parts of the brain that make us feel good, but also the effects are long-lasting and have a self-perpetuating cycle. So the more gratitude we feel, the more attuned we are to things to be grateful for, and the more benefit we find from it.

And of course, there are great health benefits from thinking positively.

The Mayo Clinic suggests the following health benefits of positive thinking and optimism: 

  • Increased life span
  • Lower rates of depression, and distress
  • Greater resistance to infection
  • Better psychological and physical well-being, cardiovascular health and coping skills

So lets ditch the common forms of negative self-talk such as filtering, personalising, catastrophising and polarising. Instead we can learn to turn negative thinking into positive thinking. Sure it takes time and practice, but given it’s the year of the Pig, we’ve got the best chance of making a change.

Are you ready to join me in living a healthier and more joyful life? You are, great. Just click on this link to get started.

The author has used Health Storylines since being diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumours in 2016. After more than a year documenting her health via the app, she has become a Self-Care Ambassador as part of a pilot to encourage others to track their health.

Gut reaction

Life without bacteria would be impossible.— Louis Pasteur

It is hard to imagine that as the new century dawned 18 years ago the editors of Science prophesied that “human microbe research would become the new hot topic worldwide”. 

It seems gut microbiome has always been a hot topic. But it took another five years, in 2005, for the prophecy to be realised when Australian researchers Barry Marshall and Robin Warren were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery that peptic ulcer disease was primarily caused by Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium with affinity for acidic environments, such as the stomach.

In people with compromised immune systems this bacteria can cause cancer. In Australia H. pylori is classified as a class 1 carcinogen. Our top research body, the CSIRO, says Australia has one of the highest incidence rates of chronic diseases of the digestive system.

And yet we’re only just learning the link between our gut microbiome and why we get sick. In 2014 new research linked the Western diet to asthma, autism, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, emphysema and cancer. 

What this research did was reveal how a healthy diet could prove to be the best preventable medicine, even cure, because food affects the 1.5 kg of bacteria we carry deep inside our gut. 

In Canada, 2014 research revealed fixing our microbiome was as easy as eating 50g of fibre daily – “mainly in the form of resistant starch-and reduced fat and protein”. It suggested current guidelines (25g-30g) for the consumption of fibre-rich foods were too low and increasing the fibre recommendation to more than 50g was “likely to have an immediate effect on colon cancer risk”.

That’s good news given belly problems in North America account for more than 200 million doctor’s visits and billions in health care costs annually. 

But as early as 2010, Mark Hyman MD — the director of Functional Medicine in Cleveland — was already spruiking the benefits of addressing imbalances in the function and flora of the gut in his blogs.

He suggested five steps to rebalance our gut flora:

1. Eat a fibre–rich, whole foods diet—rich in beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, to feed and grow good bugs.

2. Limit sugar, processed foods, and animal fats/protein as they provide food for unhealthy bugs.

3. Avoid the use of antibiotics, acid blockers and anti-inflammatories, which change gut flora for the worse.

4. Take probiotics daily—these healthy, friendly flora can improve digestive health and reduce inflammation and allergy.

5. Consider specialised testing—such as organic acid testing, stool testing (to look at the DNA of the bacteria in your gut), and other tests to help assess gut function.

Jump to 2018 and there are myriad books, including recipes and TV medical shows on improving the microbiome, cementing the gut health revolution prophesied in 2000.

I guess we really are what we eat. And instead of popping a pill all we need do is improve our diet and double our fibre intake.

As a Health Care Ambassador for Health Storylines, it is important to be part of the movement to raise awareness of living a healthy life and being your own health advocate.

Search for this tool, or select add tool and it comes up under the Health Tracking category

It is also crucial to track symptoms. Health Storylines is useful for this, especially the Symptom Tracker tool to record and update symptoms as well as estimate severity from 1-10. It also allows you to rate the impact of all symptoms. Select done to see a graph. In addition you can add a comment, which provides handy information should you need to show it to your GP or specialist.

So, are you ready to join me in living a healthier life? You are, great. Just click on this link to get started. 

The author has used Health Storylines since being diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumours in 2016. After more than a year documenting her health via the app, she has become a Self-Care Ambassador as part of a pilot to encourage others to track their health.

Food for thought

The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not. Mark Twain

For good health we need carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and fibre, known as the six building blocks. When we eat the correct combination we provide the fuel our bodies need to grow, replenish, repair and strengthen.

Yet many of us don’t get enough nutrients in our diet. That’s where the HealthStorylines’ Diet Log is a powerful tool in helping to achieve a healthy life. By tracking what we eat, when and how we feel (rating hunger or fullness), we can keep our diet in check.

The nutrients provided in a balanced diet allow the body to function correctly, which is key to healthy living. Without proper nutrition we’re more prone to disease, infection and fatigue.

The seventh building block for a healthy diet is water, discussed at great depth in earlier RoamingRAVE posts.

‘Most people don’t eat enough fruit, vegetables and wholegrains.’

Let’s not forget the importance of a balanced diet. Our organs and tissues need proper nutrition. Healthline.com says to get the right nutrients from our diet, we should consume the majority of our daily calories in: fresh fruits. fresh vegetables and whole grains.

One of the most important benefits of fruits and vegetables is the amount of beneficial antioxidants and phytochemicals they contain.

Antioxidants give fruits and vegetables their different colours. Sanitarium.com.au suggests a handy way to make sure you’re getting a good range of antioxidants and different health benefits is to choose those you like from each of the five different colour groups.

Things to remember

  • Eating a wide variety of healthy foods promotes good health and helps to protect against chronic disease.
  • Eating a varied, well-balanced diet means eating a variety of foods from each of the five food groups daily, in the recommended amounts.
  • It is also important to choose a variety of foods from within the five food groups: (1) Vegetables and legumes/beans (2) Fruit (3) Grain (cereal) foods, mostly wholegrain and/or high cereal fibre varieties (4) Lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds and legumes/beans (5) Milk, yoghurt cheese and/or alternatives, mostly reduced fat.

It is easy to track your vegetable and fruit intake via HealthStorylines’ Diet Log to ensure you achieve your daily goal. To get the best result, track the number of vegetables and fruits you eat each day for a week. Just click on “add tools” and type in “Diet Log” in the search results field.

In no time you will be on a positive journey to increase your veggie intake. Click on this link to get started and join me in living a healthier life.

The author has used Health Storylines since being diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumours in 2016. After more than a year documenting her health via the app, she has become a Self-Care Ambassador as part of a pilot to encourage others to track their health.

It’s the thought that counts

“What we are today comes from our thoughts of yesterday, and our present thoughts build our life of tomorrow: Our life is the creation of our mind.” – Buddha

CourtesywikiHow

Courtesy of wikiHow

Creating the life we want is difficult. There is always some obstacle in our way: work commitments, finances, time pressures, how our decisions impact others.

But we know they are just excuses to stop us from moving forward. How crazy is it that we knowingly deny ourselves the life we deserve.

There’s a great saying by Alexander Graham Bell:

“Sometimes we stare so long at a door that is closing that we see too late the one that is open.” 

It’s true most of us dwell more on the reasons why we can’t do something instead of finding a solution to how we can. In effect, we miss opportunities.

Our negative thoughts hold us back.

Not everyone is a risk taker, for example a neighbour put it best. “I want to, but I just don’t have the guts to sell up and take off”.

He’s faced his reason why he can’t. He doesn’t have the resolve.

Courtesy of PsychologyToday

Courtesy of PsychologyToday

But that’s where positive thoughts can turn a situation around. When the chatter in our head overrides reason, we need to stop, take stock and write down all the pros and cons.

Because there is a way to get through a crisis, to achieve change, and create the life we want. We just need to methodically work through the things on our list that have stopped us to this point.

Another way to reprogram (or organise) our thoughts is adopting “creative visualisation” techniques. It works like this – visualise your goal as already accomplished. That is, see yourself already there!

When you do that you consciously as well as unconsciously start making changes to bring about change. Your thoughts, habits and actions help you attract the thing(s) you want.

If your goals aren’t so lofty and you seek peace of mind for more simple things in life, then you already have those tools at hand.

PositiveThoughts

Courtesy of HealthStorylines

HealthStorylines’ Positive Thoughts tool is powerful. You write down the thoughts you felt negatively about in one box, and in the next you’re challenged to come up with a brighter way of thinking about the experience.

It’s a great way to track and challenge negative thoughts.To get the best result, track your thoughts for a week. Just click on “add tools” and type in “Positive Thoughts” in the search results field to bring it up.

Another great tool to focus the mind is to watch the Mindfulness Learning video. Just select “add tools” and search for it.

MindfulnessLearning

Courtesy of HealthStorylines

In no time you will be on a positive journey to track your thoughts. Click on this link to get started.

The author has used Health Storylines since being diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumours in 2016. After more than a year documenting her health via the app, she has become a Self-Care Ambassador as part of a pilot to encourage others to track their health.

The greatest wealth is health

“To insure good health: eat lightly, breathe deeply, live moderately, cultivate cheerfulness, and maintain an interest in life.”  ~ William Londen

Today is International Self-Care Day. It is really important to look after yourself. If you don’t feel great, investigate (the cause). 

You owe it to yourself to live the best life feeling good, even great. You may need only tweak your self-care by eating more healthily, drinking more water, taking a multi-vitamin, getting 15 minutes of sunshine daily while adding exercise to your routine. Or, you may need to demand to see a specialist to confirm your hunch that there’s something amiss.

The best way to get your health issues heard is to track your symptoms so you can take something concrete to a GP and discuss the next step.

FoodDiaryI use Health Storylines Food Diary and Symptom Tracker tools for that. You don’t have to suffer from a chronic illness to take advantage of this easy-to-use tracking system. It you have any food intolerance, or just generally don’t feel up to par, tracking what you eat and when may be key to shaping a new way of living that can optimise your health.

Who wants to go through life feeling unwell. By tracking your reaction to foods you consume, you will discover which products trigger symptoms (bloating, gas, nausea even constipation or diarrhoea).

It takes about two weeks of monitoring what you eat and how you feel to see a pattern. It is easy to do, just take five minutes at the end of your day to write down what you ate (via the Food Diary) and how it made you feel (Symptom Tracker). 

There’s good reason for the saying food is medicine. If you need a kick along, follow The Australian Dietary Guidelines, which has information about the types and amounts of foods, food groups and dietary patterns that aim to: promote health and wellbeing; reduce the risk of diet-related conditions, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity.

Your GP can refer you to a dietician and exercise physiologist if you want to tackle two issues together.

For those suffering the same condition as me (NETs), this video provides a quick snapshot into avoiding food triggers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45uK0yWEbEQ

In no time you’ll be on your way to feeling great. Happy International Self-Care Day!

Hope you join me on the fitness journey to track food and symptoms. Just click on this link to get started.

The author has used the Health Storylines since being diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumours of the small intestine in 2016. After more than a year documenting her health via the app, she has become a Self-Care Ambassador as part of a pilot to encourage others to track their health.

Take a walk on the scenic side

Walking meditation is a way to practice moving without a goal or intention. Mindful walking means walking while being aware of each step and breath. — Gaiam

There’s lots of statistics explaining how exercise makes us happier. We’re fitter because of it, the feel-good endorphins released improve our mood and, yes, it boosts our immunity.

So what about simple walking. How does that fit into the exercise equation? Glad you asked. Like daily exercise, just going for a stroll has heaps of health benefits. And what better way to get to know your neighbourhood.

Within five minutes of going for a walk, you’re guaranteed to feel happier.

Now take it to another level by introducing mindfulness into your walk. You need to become aware of all the nooks and crannies you didn’t noticed previously. Like the bird on the branch, the rustle of the leaves, the wind touching your face, even the hard surface under your feet.

How does that make you feel? Calm springs to mind. By allowing yourself to be present you’ll really notice your surrounds and bring the beauty of your neighbourhood to life.

What matters is the walk, what you see, feel and hear with each step. In turn you reap the health benefits of walking as an exercise, as well as gaining mindfulness by being “in the moment” and discovering an ability to just let everything else go.

Now add breathing to the mix. Swing one arm back and forward, and rest the other on your abdomen. Feel your tummy go in and out and you’ve mastered the art of breathing deeply.

It feels great. It’s like you’ve never breathed properly until you learn to move the breath away from your chest and into your diaphragm.

With each step and breath oxygen awakens your senses allowing your heart rate to drop as you walk, not increase (no matter how fast you go).

Once you’ve signed on to Health Storylines, select tools and under Physical Activity you’ll find the Exercise Diary. Just add it and get tracking!

This Health Storylines challenge can be done daily, or weekly but as usual you need to track it. Use the Exercise Diary tool to record your efforts. It allows you to set a date, the activity and length of activity. As part of your circle of support, you can also include family and friends who have joined you on Health Storylines. It’s a great way to expand your support to achieve your goals.

It’s all about introducing fitness into your day. The aim is to build on this so you can introduce more intensive exercise for up to 30 minutes. Next you’ll be ready for the challenge of walking daily over 5 days. Once you’ve achieved that, who knows it could become a daily meditation for you, as it has become for me.

Hope you join me on the fitness journey of walking each day to enjoy your surrounds. Just click on this link to get started.

The author has used the Health Storylines since being diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumours of the small intestine in 2016. After more than a year documenting her health via the app, she has become a Self-Care Ambassador as part of a pilot to encourage others to track their health. 

Health benefits of drinking water

Now that we know how important water is for our health, the next burning question is how much water is really enough. It can be difficult to achieve eight glasses a day.

The Mayo Clinic suggests our fluid intake is probably adequate if we rarely feel thirsty or our urine is colourless or light yellow.

That’s an easy marker to track given we can combine drinking fluids and eating foods that contain water to achieve our daily target.

But don’t fall into the trap of thinking all fluids are equal.

A 2016 study in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics provided proof of the power of “water over other drinks if we want to control weight”. ScienceDaily said researchers from the University of Illinois examined the dietary habits of more than 18,300 US adults, and found the majority of participants who increased their consumption of plain water by 1 per cent reduced their total daily calorie intake as well as their consumption of saturated fat, sugar, sodium and cholesterol. 

That’s a great benefit for doing something so simple.

And there are even more health gains.

If you haven’t begun the Health Storylines Challenge to Drink 8 cups of water every day for 5 days, now is your chance. Click on this link. It is never too late to get started.

Return here tomorrow for the final chapter in the wonders of water.

Judy Wilkinson has used the Health Storylines app since being diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumours of the small intestine in 2016. After more than a year documenting her health via the app, she has become a Self-Care Ambassador as part of a pilot to encourage others to track their health.